Top Day Trips from Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur offers visitors much to see and do, but if you want some time away from the crowds, we know exactly where you should go. KL is well- connected to its surrounding areas, so plenty of options are available to you. Here are some ideas for day trips from Kuala Lumpur:

Kuala Gandah Elephant Sanctuary

(Photo credit: ww.nre.gov.my)

(Photo credit: ww.nre.gov.my)

The Kuala Gandah Elephant Sanctuary is located in the village of Lanchang in the state of Pahang about 160kms from Kuala Lumpur. The sanctuary, which is managed by the Malaysian Department of Wildlife and National Parks, was established in 1989 to provide temporary shelter to orphaned elephants or those whose lives are threatened due to encroachment. The elephants undergo rehabilitation and are then relocated back to the wild.

At the sanctuary, visitors can see elephants being fed and bathed by the mahouts. Occasionally visitors are allowed to bathe with the elephants, but if the animals appear distressed, the mahouts will request visitors to get out of the water. In order to minimise human contact, elephant rides have been stopped.

To get to the Kuala Gandah Elephant Sanctuary, you need to rent a car or get on a tour. If you’re driving from KL, take the Karak Highway heading towards Lancang District. When you reach Lanchang, look out for a BP gas station by the roadside- turn left before the station, then follow the signs and head for Bolok. The elephant sanctuary lies at the end of the road. Go here for more details.

Pulau Ketam

(Photo credit: www.pulauketam.com)

(Photo credit: www.pulauketam.com)

What? A village an hour away from KL with no cars or buses? You got that right. None of the residents of Pulau Ketam (Crab Island) owns anything on four wheels, the most they’ll have is a bike, a motorcycle and maybe a fishing boat. It’s not as though they need a car- the two villages on the island are within walking distance of each other, while amenities like shops, restaurants and the police station are easy to reach on foot.

Most of the 6,000 residents are fishermen, so Pulau Ketam is the place to be for fresh and delicious seafood. To work up an appetite, you can explore the villages on foot or rent a bike and go around the island. Pulau Ketam is very easy to get to: take a KTM Komuter train from KL Sentral to Port Klang, the last stop on the Sentul-Port Klang line. When you exit the station, you will see signs pointing towards the jetty. Boats to Pulau Ketam leave every hour or so. Click here for more info.

 

Janda Baik

(Photo credit: www.panoramio.com)

(Photo credit: www.panoramio.com)

Janda Baik is only a 30-minute drive from sometimes-chaotic KL and yet so different. The air surrounding the village of Janda Baik is cool and clean thanks to its location in the rainforest. Nearby streams and waterfalls also give daytrippers a chance to hike and explore the area and have a picnic.

If you plan ahead, you’ll be able to book a white water rafting trip, engage a guide for short hikes in the jungle (don’t forget your mosquito repellent!) or even do some abseiling. The easiest way to get to Janda Baik (if you’re travelling independently) would be to take the KTM Komuter train to Gombak station, then take a taxi to the village- a one-way ride should cost about RM60.

For more information, go here.

 

 

Batu Caves

(Photo credit: http://www.vertical-adventure.com/)

(Photo credit: http://www.vertical-adventure.com/)

Every visitor to KL is told of Batu Caves, with its 400 million-year-old limestone caves and the massive gold statue of Lord Murugan, but few people know that rock climbing enthusiasts have been scaling the limestone outcrops in the area for more than 10 years. To make the most of your day trip, before you walk up the 272 steps to the temple complex and marvel at the caves’ interior, book a guided rock- climbing session at Batu Caves. Go here and here for details.

Getting to Batu Caves is easy: take a KTM Komuter train and get down at Batu Caves station, and you’re there!

HAPPY EXPLORING!